LeadingRE Las Vegas 2014: What Makes the Largest Real Estate Brokerages Successful?

February 28th, 2014 – in miscellaneous events

New York City-based Halstead Property sent a team of 15 to Las Vegas for the Leading Real Estate Companies of the World's annual conference, where they had a large presence among their peers. But there was a bit of concern on the first evening, when the brokerage misplaced a large box with very important possessions.

Halstead relocation consultant Shira Rosenhaft was stationed in the long, wide hallway that housed the conference's meeting rooms, awaiting word that the box — containing golf towels and chocolates — was found. The towels and sweets were to be handed out at the company's booth during a three-hour networking session. Without them, Real Estate and technology professionals may very well have passed right by their booth in favor of others with T-shirts, chewing gum, magnets or other trinkets.

While the search was underway, Rosenhaft took some time to talk about her business, with nearly 1,000 agents, and what made it successful.

“Halstead represents the best qualities in Real Estate," Rosenhaft said. "We are an extremely ethical company, very friendly, family company even though we are quite large now. We have a great knowledge of the New York City metropolitan area. We’re also in New Jersey, Brooklyn, the Hamptons, Riverdale and the Bronx, too."

Propertybase spoke with many of the largest brokerages represented at the LeadingRE conference, and most of them said their biggest strength was knowing and understanding the communities in which they do business.

“(Success) starts at the top, said MaryEllen Closius of Weston, Flor.-based Keyes Real Estate. The business has more than 2,000 agents in 32 offices. "We are a family-owned business. Around since 1926. It’s still runs like it did when it was started.”

Over and over again, Propertybase learned that the businesses that took time to learn about their potential client base and their cities were also some of the largest in their markets.

The missing box was located right before doors opened, and the missing loot was well-received, Rosenhaft later reported.

Come back Monday for our final coverage from the LeadingRE conference, a report on managing electronic leads. Share your conference memories and experiences in the comments section, below.

Author: Roman Gokhman